Bungy Jumping In Auckland

New Zealand is widely known as the capital of extreme sports, and rightfully so.

I tell ya, those Kiwis are a bunch of crazy people.
When Malaysians have nothing else better to do, we watch a DVD, maybe play Counterstrike or write a blog. When Kiwis have nothing else better to do, those nutcases find an excuse to perform death-defying stunts like hiking through Antartica or jumping off a bridge for thrills.

The popular “extreme sport” known as bungy jumping, is in fact first commercialised by a New Zealander by the name of AJ Hackett.
Most of you guys probably don’t know this, but I am actually quite a pro in extreme sports. And by extreme sports, I mean gliding down the slide in a kid’s playground.

Extreme sheeps

Since I’ve travelled all the way to New Zealand, capital of extreme sports and home of commercialised bungy jumping, I figured why not give this easy little game a shot.

And what better place for my first bungy jump than at Auckland Harbour Bridge, the landmark icon of the City of Sails.
Bungy jumping off the Auckland Harbour Bridge costs NZD85/RM208 per person, which is pretty expensive considering what I’m about to put myself through. The fun begins as soon as I was suited up with a very tight harness.

Suddenly I feel like I about to engage in S&M activities.
Anyway, we were led to AJ Hackett’s purpose-built bungy jump pod, located about 10 minutes from their office underneath the Auckland Harbour Bridge.

The walk to the top was actually quite pleasant, if not for the fact that IT IS A VERY FAR WAY TO THE BOTTOM.
I never had a problem with a fear of height. But watching the water flow beneath the bridge is very different to knowing that you’re about to jump all the way down in a few minutes.

I looked down to the water. We were at least 40 metres up. That’s the height of a 15-storey high building. That’s like jumping off and freefalling from the top of Hilton Kuching.
By the time we reached the platform, I know there’s no turning back. At this point, I feel really stupid for paying over RM200 just to jump down a bridge.

There’s five of us, and the jumping order was decided in the order of decreasing weight. The instructor wrote our weight on our hand with red marker pen, which is really sad because for the rest of the day I had to walk around Auckland with my weight clearly written on my hand.
Insultingly, I was the heaviest among the group. That means I got to go first. *#%*&$&%$%!!

There’s nothing much I could do. All I did was sit there and letting him suit me up.
I was scared. No, I was terrified. In fact, I was pissing my pants. And there’s no toilet around.
Before I know it, I was teteering at the edge of the jumping platform, the instructor was holding onto my harness. And then he went “5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1 – GO!”

Just click to watch the video. Words cannot do this justice.
All I remember was that my veins were pumping as I stood on the ledge. I remember letting out a good scream, and as I jumped, my heart almost jumped out from my mouth. I remember reaching out to touch the icecold river water, then spinning and spinning aimlessly in midair as I waited for them to haul me up.
What I don’t remember is, WHY THE HELL AM I PAYING MONEY TO DO THIS?!
One thing for sure, the adrenaline rush I experienced was absolutely incredible.

Afterwards, we went back to the office and I was further raped by AJ Hackett for a set of photos and DVD costing NZD60 / RM147. In the end, I spent a total of about RM350 for my first bungy jump, and it was worth every single cent of it.
Best of all, I even got a certificate to prove myself.

Well, bungy jumping may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but this is one exhilarating activity that comes 100% recommended from me. We lived only once, so might as well make full use of it yea?

Bungy jumping is fun.
It’s like committing suicide. Without dying.


Auckland feels a little bit like a miniature version of Sydney. The coastal city by any chance isn’t big compared to most cities I’ve been to, but it sure beats them with her amazing architectural and natural beauty.

144 Replies to “Bungy Jumping In Auckland”

  1. hello!kenny!GREAT blog!
    btw,it’s so funny when you mentioned that the heaviest person among the group has to jump first..LOL..

  2. nice one.
    i remembered my bro going for one in shanghai, and i was waiting down below. and i saw this strapped up person (prolly having his turn next) diggin his nose. his girlfriend had to wipe his icky goo out from his nose. what was more disgusting was, she wiped the goo on the hand rail right in front of me. YUCK!
    well, anyway. you seem to be having lots of fun.
    take care dude.
    : )

  3. I salute to you. I dare not la, how did you do that? I mean I assume you are also afraid of these things and not an adrenaline junky right? So basically you just paid for it without thinking so that there’s no turning back?

  4. try skydiving.. the price is slightly higher but i tell you it much more worth it than bungee jumping..plus u also get a DVD and a cert..dive first pay next..

  5. whoa… i have to try this soon!! 350… only, cheap considering i get to experience how people who jump of bridges feel before they die………. WITHOUT DYING! wohoo!!!!!!!!!

  6. my first time posting a comment in ur blog..anyway, it looked fun..oh yea, and thanx for the info about the heaviest goes first..next time if i try that, i will bring friends that are heavier than me so that i don;’t have to go first..haha

  7. kenny… ppl asked you to make a big leap le!!!
    keke! but still must praise you for your courage le :p
    i´m planning to go bungee jumping and sky-diving too as soon as i hv the time… i heard they hv this kind of extreme sports package trip to thailand that includes thess two things wor…
    as for whether it´s safe or not…hehe cheaper than going auckland or aussie le… but recently coup… c le when! since i´m bored with most roller coasters, free-fall rides, or other stuffs which turns upside down.
    i think i need the adrenaline rush once in awhile 😉

  8. CONGRATS!
    i have promised myself few years ago that i must make a bungee jump at least once in my life. hope i can do it real soon.
    it’s damn EXpensive can? hehe.
    have a nice hols!

  9. I think they were chuckling because they expected you to leap, not jump feet first. Their chuckling spoiled the video…hehehe…

  10. whoa… that was fun… there’s this list of things i wanna do in my life n bungy jump is surely 1 of them. it was funny 2 see the way u walk 2 the edge n yell when u jump… really wanna try that myself… enjoy ur trip!!

  11. Wow..bungee jumping in NZ is pretty cheap. I’m an adrenaline junkie myself too. You should try skydiving as well if you get a chance. It’s a real exhilarating experience.

  12. I did the Nevis bungee in Queenstown.. was 134m… WORTH RM500 plus.. was the longest 8 secs of my life… hehe
    U shud go try that …
    Wil be in Chch by the next day.. den Nelson den Wel… den Auck… 😉

  13. Kenny .. you are THE MAN !~
    i think i will go for bunjee jump if i want to die Hehe~
    New Zealand is just a piece of heaven isnt it 😉

  14. Gosh… you are so brave to attempt it. I will never ever try in my life because i have necrophobia. hehehe… Anyway i love ur post, risk your life and share with us.

  15. man oh man!!! that entry was hilarious!
    I LURVE the last line, btw!
    ‘It’s like committing suicide. Without dying.’
    good one. LOL

  16. Better to call a spade, a spade
    • News Comment
    KIM QUEK
    IN the chorus of protests against Singapore Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew’s recent remark that Chinese Malaysians have been marginalised, one simple question remains unanswered.
    .
    If there has been no racial marginalisation, why has the word meritocracy been a taboo in Malaysian politics ever since the racial riots of May 13,1969?
    .
    A few more simple questions: Why has there been a massive and unrelenting brain drain since then, resulting in many Chinese Malaysians excelling in many fields in foreign lands? Why has there been a virtual monopoly by one race in the whole spectrum of the public sector, from the army and civil service to the judiciary and universities?
    .
    Why have there been, year after year, top Chinese Malaysian students barred from universities, only to be admitted later (for some) upon begging by Chinese Cabinet ministers?
    .
    No doubt Mr Lee may be faulted for lacking diplomatic niceties in his remarks, but he has spoken the truth. And I think every Malaysian knows that, at least in the deepest part of his heart.
    .
    Yes, we have been practising racial discrimination, and that is a zero sum game. When race A is barred so that race B can get in, it is one side’s loss and another side’s gain.
    .
    It is sheer dishonesty and hypocrisy to deny that no race has suffered a disadvantage as a result of this policy.
    .
    But the real question is: Is such policy justified? To answer that, we have to go back to where such policy started — the New Economic Policy (NEP), formulated after the racial riots in 1969.
    .
    In its original concept, the NEP’s prime objective was to achieve national unity and the strategy was two-pronged: To eradicate poverty irrespective of race, and to restructure society so as to eliminate the identification of race with economic function.
    .
    There is nothing wrong with such an affirmative action policy, but the tragedy is that over the years, through racial hegemony, it has been transformed into a policy synonymous with racial privileges.
    .
    There is no question that in spite of the misapplication, the NEP has achieved its limited objective of elevating the status of Malays to a respectable level, compared to that of other races.
    .
    But such anachronistic and regressive policy has no place in the globalising world or in any civilised society. As it is, the pressure to dismantle such policy does not come from within — as the deprived races seem powerless to redress this wrong — but from the whole world who are our trading partners.
    .
    Our trade negotiators should be able to testify how tough the going is when it comes to negotiating free trade agreements — whether it is regional marketing pacts or bilateral agreements — due to the presence of Malaysia’s race-based protectionist policies.
    .
    These NEP-inspired policies stand as stumbling blocks to the opening of a wider window for two-way trades and investments.
    .
    Even worse is the loss of Malaysia’s economic competitiveness in the face of rising competition from abroad.
    .
    Our prime minister has correctly diagnosed this malaise as the prevalence of our third-world mentality, but he has not done enough to correct our uncompetitive culture or to stamp out our worsening racial and religious divide.
    .
    Mr Lee’s comments have understandably riled many Malaysian leaders, but it should also have struck resonance among many who have silently put up with these unjust policies all these years.
    .
    The great silent majority should now ponder what would serve their interests best: To save face by angrily rebutting Mr Lee, or to stare at the ugly truth and institute changes that will put the nation on the right path?
    .
    We have reached a stage in our history critical enough to warrant caution in putting too much trust in incumbent leaders. The fact that we have scraped through as a nation despite such policies does not guarantee we will be similarly lucky in the future.
    .
    Internal and external circumstances have so altered that we can no longer commit such major errors without putting our future in peril. From this perspective, Mr Lee’s bitter medicine may yet work to our advantage, if we are humble and brave enough to do some serious introspection that may lead to our common good.
    .
    The writer is a political commentator
    .
    and author of the Malaysian best-seller, Where to, Malaysia?.
    • News Comment
    KIM QUEK
    IN the chorus of protests against Singapore Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew’s recent remark that Chinese Malaysians have been marginalised, one simple question remains unanswered.
    .
    If there has been no racial marginalisation, why has the word meritocracy been a taboo in Malaysian politics ever since the racial riots of May 13,1969?
    .
    A few more simple questions: Why has there been a massive and unrelenting brain drain since then, resulting in many Chinese Malaysians excelling in many fields in foreign lands? Why has there been a virtual monopoly by one race in the whole spectrum of the public sector, from the army and civil service to the judiciary and universities?
    .
    Why have there been, year after year, top Chinese Malaysian students barred from universities, only to be admitted later (for some) upon begging by Chinese Cabinet ministers?
    .
    No doubt Mr Lee may be faulted for lacking diplomatic niceties in his remarks, but he has spoken the truth. And I think every Malaysian knows that, at least in the deepest part of his heart.
    .
    Yes, we have been practising racial discrimination, and that is a zero sum game. When race A is barred so that race B can get in, it is one side’s loss and another side’s gain.
    .
    It is sheer dishonesty and hypocrisy to deny that no race has suffered a disadvantage as a result of this policy.
    .
    But the real question is: Is such policy justified? To answer that, we have to go back to where such policy started — the New Economic Policy (NEP), formulated after the racial riots in 1969.
    .
    In its original concept, the NEP’s prime objective was to achieve national unity and the strategy was two-pronged: To eradicate poverty irrespective of race, and to restructure society so as to eliminate the identification of race with economic function.
    .
    There is nothing wrong with such an affirmative action policy, but the tragedy is that over the years, through racial hegemony, it has been transformed into a policy synonymous with racial privileges.
    .
    There is no question that in spite of the misapplication, the NEP has achieved its limited objective of elevating the status of Malays to a respectable level, compared to that of other races.
    .
    But such anachronistic and regressive policy has no place in the globalising world or in any civilised society. As it is, the pressure to dismantle such policy does not come from within — as the deprived races seem powerless to redress this wrong — but from the whole world who are our trading partners.
    .
    Our trade negotiators should be able to testify how tough the going is when it comes to negotiating free trade agreements — whether it is regional marketing pacts or bilateral agreements — due to the presence of Malaysia’s race-based protectionist policies.
    .
    These NEP-inspired policies stand as stumbling blocks to the opening of a wider window for two-way trades and investments.
    .
    Even worse is the loss of Malaysia’s economic competitiveness in the face of rising competition from abroad.
    .
    Our prime minister has correctly diagnosed this malaise as the prevalence of our third-world mentality, but he has not done enough to correct our uncompetitive culture or to stamp out our worsening racial and religious divide.
    .
    Mr Lee’s comments have understandably riled many Malaysian leaders, but it should also have struck resonance among many who have silently put up with these unjust policies all these years.
    .
    The great silent majority should now ponder what would serve their interests best: To save face by angrily rebutting Mr Lee, or to stare at the ugly truth and institute changes that will put the nation on the right path?
    .
    We have reached a stage in our history critical enough to warrant caution in putting too much trust in incumbent leaders. The fact that we have scraped through as a nation despite such policies does not guarantee we will be similarly lucky in the future.
    .
    Internal and external circumstances have so altered that we can no longer commit such major errors without putting our future in peril. From this perspective, Mr Lee’s bitter medicine may yet work to our advantage, if we are humble and brave enough to do some serious introspection that may lead to our common good.
    .
    The writer is a political commentator
    .
    and author of the Malaysian best-seller, Where to, Malaysia?.
    • News Comment
    KIM QUEK
    IN the chorus of protests against Singapore Minister Mentor Lee Kuan Yew’s recent remark that Chinese Malaysians have been marginalised, one simple question remains unanswered.
    .
    If there has been no racial marginalisation, why has the word meritocracy been a taboo in Malaysian politics ever since the racial riots of May 13,1969?
    .
    A few more simple questions: Why has there been a massive and unrelenting brain drain since then, resulting in many Chinese Malaysians excelling in many fields in foreign lands? Why has there been a virtual monopoly by one race in the whole spectrum of the public sector, from the army and civil service to the judiciary and universities?
    .
    Why have there been, year after year, top Chinese Malaysian students barred from universities, only to be admitted later (for some) upon begging by Chinese Cabinet ministers?
    .
    No doubt Mr Lee may be faulted for lacking diplomatic niceties in his remarks, but he has spoken the truth. And I think every Malaysian knows that, at least in the deepest part of his heart.
    .
    Yes, we have been practising racial discrimination, and that is a zero sum game. When race A is barred so that race B can get in, it is one side’s loss and another side’s gain.
    .
    It is sheer dishonesty and hypocrisy to deny that no race has suffered a disadvantage as a result of this policy.
    .
    But the real question is: Is such policy justified? To answer that, we have to go back to where such policy started — the New Economic Policy (NEP), formulated after the racial riots in 1969.
    .
    In its original concept, the NEP’s prime objective was to achieve national unity and the strategy was two-pronged: To eradicate poverty irrespective of race, and to restructure society so as to eliminate the identification of race with economic function.
    .
    There is nothing wrong with such an affirmative action policy, but the tragedy is that over the years, through racial hegemony, it has been transformed into a policy synonymous with racial privileges.
    .
    There is no question that in spite of the misapplication, the NEP has achieved its limited objective of elevating the status of Malays to a respectable level, compared to that of other races.
    .
    But such anachronistic and regressive policy has no place in the globalising world or in any civilised society. As it is, the pressure to dismantle such policy does not come from within — as the deprived races seem powerless to redress this wrong — but from the whole world who are our trading partners.
    .
    Our trade negotiators should be able to testify how tough the going is when it comes to negotiating free trade agreements — whether it is regional marketing pacts or bilateral agreements — due to the presence of Malaysia’s race-based protectionist policies.
    .
    These NEP-inspired policies stand as stumbling blocks to the opening of a wider window for two-way trades and investments.
    .
    Even worse is the loss of Malaysia’s economic competitiveness in the face of rising competition from abroad.
    .
    Our prime minister has correctly diagnosed this malaise as the prevalence of our third-world mentality, but he has not done enough to correct our uncompetitive culture or to stamp out our worsening racial and religious divide.
    .
    Mr Lee’s comments have understandably riled many Malaysian leaders, but it should also have struck resonance among many who have silently put up with these unjust policies all these years.
    .
    The great silent majority should now ponder what would serve their interests best: To save face by angrily rebutting Mr Lee, or to stare at the ugly truth and institute changes that will put the nation on the right path?
    .
    We have reached a stage in our history critical enough to warrant caution in putting too much trust in incumbent leaders. The fact that we have scraped through as a nation despite such policies does not guarantee we will be similarly lucky in the future.
    .
    Internal and external circumstances have so altered that we can no longer commit such major errors without putting our future in peril. From this perspective, Mr Lee’s bitter medicine may yet work to our advantage, if we are humble and brave enough to do some serious introspection that may lead to our common good.
    .
    The writer is a political commentator
    .
    and author of the Malaysian best-seller, Where to, Malaysia?.
    • News Comment

  17. When I see you reached the platform, I “chicken out” already.
    Kenny, which airlines you took from Singapore to Australia ? Is it TigerAir or ValueAir ?
    Thanks …

  18. Wow.. you are brave!!! Really brave! u sure all you did previously was slide down a kid’s playground? Great job though.. now u can tell ur grandkids grandpa did a bungee jump before! =) maybe someday i’ll do it.. someday..

  19. RM350 for the jump!!! oh man… ive been thinking about bungee jumping for a long time n i really want to do it in NZ too. but RM350?!! whoa…

  20. Two years ago when I was still studying in Melbourne, during the break in July, my girlfriend and I went backpacking through the whole of the east coast. My last stop was Cairns and that was where I got to a place called AJ Hackett as well. Hahahaha, I got a better deal than you cos I paid AUD150 for unlimited jumps and I did 3 jumps. Having a natural fear of heights, I almost shat myself but as you said, I have already invested approximately RM450 bucks into it. I thought it would be easy but I stood there like a complete idiot for almost 10 minutes before I jumped. It did not help when I looked down and the instructor told me to look at the horizon and it only made matters worse as now I feel even higher than before. The three jumps were great and each and everytime, I will still wanna shit my pants. You have your name printed on the cert but mine was written on it with a marker and with a smiley face beside my name. It was truly great. My next one… sky-diving. White water rafting’s great too and if I remember correctly, you have done that as well… So if you fancy jumping off a plane next, holler me k.

  21. holy fk..this is amazing man! i’m so not gonna get myself up there and plunge!!
    btw, can send those bungy sheep back? 😀 they are so cute..

  22. that looks frikkin cool…. my heart almost stopped when i watched the video gotta try it sometime… love the part when your head dips in the water… hahahaha

  23. You’re supposed to dive head first, not jump off leg first u overweight piece of shit. U wasted half of the dive by your pussy-ass jump, fatso.

  24. Yo….hahahhaha that was funny dude. Your knees were like glued together before you jump. Hahaha. It’s cool man, would like to bungee one day…..one day……ahem…..

  25. nice kenny…try rolling down a hill in a plastic ball…kinda hamstery but a lot of fun…if i’m not wrong…they have it in auckland too….you make me wanna go bungee jumping too…but i think there’s a weight and age limit…is there?

  26. wow…kenny….You remind me of my first bungee jumping…i was nervous, panic, worried, anxious, excited….too many feelings and you are right….the adrenaline rush was INCREDIBLE!!

  27. Bungy Jumping in Cantonis is called Pan (Stupid) Chie (Pig) Thiu (Jump). Coz cantonis pronounce Bungy as Pan-Chie (Stupid Pig)…

  28. Yeah, everyone should try Bungy at least once in their lives, it really kicks your ass. I tried in South Africa, a tandem jump with my girlfriend. I literally had to push her off the ramp, she was so nervous, but so was I. The sensation of free fall is a heart stopper but when we hung in the ropes after the jump we couldn’t stop laughing, it was such a kick.
    2 years ago I was planning to do the biggest jump in the world, The Storms River jump also in South Africa. It’s from a bridge that is 216 meters high and the actual fall when jumping is 160 meters, it’s insane but unfortunately I didn’t get to do it.

  29. Yo Kennny
    Whats with the tight black tees? Seems that you are wearing one from Macau to NZ. Simon Cowell wannabe??? 🙂
    And I know you arent taking picture of your cert only. hehe. Large angmoh b**bs.

  30. Don’t tell me u go all the way to Auckland just to pay to bungee jump! If So, U should let me know earlier, i could have set u up to jump off the bridge between Petronas Twin Tower. That’s my definition of Xtreme. I’ll charge u same price, but u saved on your flight ticket. 😉

  31. I couldn’t help laughing to myself when you leaped and sounded like pre-mature ejaculation and others giggles &laughters at the back. You really got balls – perhaps not just 2 coconuts but a whole plantation. You lived your life well!

  32. nice try man!!!!u r brave…if you really dare,please come to genting,play the outdoor themepark,the suicide machine!!!SPACE SHOOT!!haha,i half die when playing that!!

  33. pah! your experience, when compared to mine is peanuts! oh, and what did I do? Wanna try bungy jumping from a twin otter plane? That’s what you’ld get when you’re in hawaii! And it’s free!

  34. You sure proved that you’ve got balls the size of coconuts there. Might have shrunk before the jump, but I’m sure it has expanded now eh? Probably time to get a new underwear 😀
    Cheers to that, good read.

  35. I went to the exact same bungy place as you before! It was awesome! I know exactly what you mean about all those thoughts going thru ur head as u are about to jump off!
    Gives you both an adrenaline rush and euphoria too. Left me giggling to myself through out the day >

  36. Congrats Kenny for doing the bungee jump. I did my bungee jump in NZ too but in Roturoa. So probally you can try the Zorb next if you ever go to Roturoa

  37. To
    better call a spade a spade,why? u write all you fucking rubbish thing to this kennysia.com who want to read your rubbish ,why dont u start u own blog instead of using kennysia.com. u think u are so smart give comment .fuck u deep deep so boaring

  38. since you are still in auckland, go to snowplanet!!! you can be a cheapo like most of us and grab a A-Z booklet and get free rental… saves you 14 bucks…

  39. Congratulations Kenny. Like I always tell people – TRY it! Your jump and mine are exactly the same – leg first instead of head first and only later switched to dive position. Great feeling ain’t it? I did my jump a few years back at AJ Hackett’s Nevis and it was the best thing I’ve ever done! No regrets and will definitely go for it again. Next would be sky dive for sure!

  40. I was watching the clip and couldn’t close my mouth back. ‘[]’
    I’m so gonna drag my boyfriend and try it out! But I’m sure I’ll end up doing this alone and having him watching me only.

  41. Wow! your bungy jump cert looks nicer than mine. Wohooo, if you have a chance, would you do it again kenny? 🙂 I don’t think I will especially after having a kid. 😛

  42. There’s this little steamboat that takes people for a ride in the harbour. You can take it at the sailing museum, where they have the America’s Cup winning black boat on display – I think.

  43. I did the bungy too, but it was on top of the rapid river near Queenstown..
    Only remembered that I jumped, dip my head in the water, and i can’t recall anything in between, I sort of blackout..

  44. When I was reading this entry at the beginning, I tot u might end up not doing it…UNBELIEVEABLE!!
    Once again, I was proven wrong! During your last marothon race, I never tot u could make it too.
    Bravo!!! I think your balls are not of the size of coconut, but the size and weight of watermelon.

  45. Wah! Keng eh! Your reaction is really funny before you jump. But to see you really jump down, you sounded like you have loads of fun and enjoying it!
    I look forward to see you skydive! Hahaha!!

  46. It sure was fun!! Wowahhaha that was how i feel too 2 years back I did my bungy jump. But i honestly ask u this qns, will you do that again?? Err i dun think so.

  47. Looks fun … but I’m not emo enough to try to kill myself without dying anymore. Got kids to think about heh. Really kena assrape for the price o_O You know what’s the most XTreme Sport? It’s not Bungee Jumping, it’s driving in Chicago during rush hour.

  48. on the contrary, not all kiwis bungy jump… in fact i’d say the majority of kiwis havent even been on a bungy. It’s more of a tourist thing…

  49. I read from an article once, a girl from Britain did this bungy jump when she was in New Zealand. Not long after that, she became blind. It seems that the cause of her blindness was the bungy jump. I still have that magazine in my drawer.

  50. I’m in Auckland, but i actually bungy-ed for the first time in Queenstown, the birth place of the bungy.. the view was great!!!! altho u cant really concentrate on the view when u’re pissing your pants.. hehe

  51. i met the actual Aj hackett himself recently kenny…he was in kl to overlook his setup at kl tower where he is operating this reverse bungee thing and soon to setup….descend from k.l. tower stunt!

  52. hahahhaha Hey Kenny you are damn brave! You must have pulled all your guts together to make that jump! For me, I would rather stick to my Scuba Diving than jumping off from the bridge… 😛 hmmmmm… second thought, perhaps I would dare to try if I were in NZ…

  53. ya,NZ has tonnes of Adrenaline-rushing stuff to do, including ‘Auckland tower jump’ 😀
    I lived in Dunedin,South Island for just about a year under my student exchange program (AFS, American Field Service);but unfortunately i was too chicken to try those extreme stuff…My heart nearly stopped beating when i watched a video clip of my friend challenging the highest bungy jump in Queenstown….

  54. wow…way to go.now confused if i want to try it or not.it looks way too scary compared to genting highland game hohoho.nice blog!! ^_^

  55. we do only live once and we should enjoy it, but i will never risk potentially killing myself just so i can live life. Chloe= never bungy jumping! :S

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